Alaska Landscape - Rugged Alaska Print Shop
"Gale-force Aurora" - One winter afternoon, I set off for a high tarn in Alaska's Chugach Mountains. The tarn has a Northern view, and the Aurora was forecast to be exceptional. I was hoping for Aurora reflections in the ice on the tarn, with surrounding mountains for context.   I arrived here about 6:30 pm on a Saturday night. A freezing gale was roaring through this high mountain pass, and though I was bundled in six layers top, and five below, I shivered all night and kept wishing I'd brought one more layer, and warmer gloves and boots.   No sooner had I arrived, and the Aurora came out. It was quite a spectacular first wave, but it was over before I could set up for photography. Worse, an overcast drifted in, blanketing out the whole sky at my location.   I stayed awake all night long, buffeted behind a boulder to stay out of the hurricane most of the night while overcast prevailed. All night I could see a glow through the overcast, and knew that a spectacular display was going on overhead, but out of sight. Every time a break in the clouds presented itself, I'd clamber across the boulder field in the dark, trying not to get blown over (and not always succeeding) and racing to find a composition that worked for each hole in the clouds I was given, before it too disappeared.   Finally, at around 6:30 am Sunday morning, this view opened up for me, which worked for the composition I'd envisioned in my climb up here. After all, I was only given a more subtle Aurora display, but I still loved how the mysterious light played on the tortured ice of that high, gale-swept mountain tarn.

"Gale-force Aurora" - One winter afternoon, I set off for a high tarn in Alaska's Chugach Mountains. The tarn has a Northern view, and the Aurora was forecast to be exceptional. I was hoping for Aurora reflections in the ice on the tarn, with surrounding mountains for context. I arrived here about 6:30 pm on a Saturday night. A freezing gale was roaring through this high mountain pass, and though I was bundled in six layers top, and five below, I shivered all night and kept wishing I'd brought one more layer, and warmer gloves and boots. No sooner had I arrived, and the Aurora came out. It was quite a spectacular first wave, but it was over before I could set up for photography. Worse, an overcast drifted in, blanketing out the whole sky at my location. I stayed awake all night long, buffeted behind a boulder to stay out of the hurricane most of the night while overcast prevailed. All night I could see a glow through the overcast, and knew that a spectacular display was going on overhead, but out of sight. Every time a break in the clouds presented itself, I'd clamber across the boulder field in the dark, trying not to get blown over (and not always succeeding) and racing to find a composition that worked for each hole in the clouds I was given, before it too disappeared. Finally, at around 6:30 am Sunday morning, this view opened up for me, which worked for the composition I'd envisioned in my climb up here. After all, I was only given a more subtle Aurora display, but I still loved how the mysterious light played on the tortured ice of that high, gale-swept mountain tarn.

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